Free VPNs: Are they worth the use?


Are you looking for a free VPN? Before you go ahead with the free VPN services, check out this article to learn if it is worth going for a Free VPN service.

How free is a free VPN? You may ask. The temptation to go for a free product is always higher. This is true, especially, when given the option of a paid product as well.

Thanks to great inventions on the internet space and the rising growth in technology, almost everything has gone digital.

While inventions make life easier and bring with them a bag of other goodies, not all are safe. Because of much internet traffic, hackers, snoopers and oppressive regimes monitor your online activities for their own selfish gains.

This brings us to the possibility of using a VPN. VPNs come both free and paid. Choosing to use a free or paid VPN is never an easy puzzle to solve.

VPNs: What are they and what do they do?




Just before we dive deeper, you could be asking the pertinent question; what is a VPN?

Simply put, a VPN is software that reroutes your internet traffic through an encrypted tunnel keeping your browsing private from the rest of the internet. VPN stands for virtual private network. It guarantees you safety and privacy online by also masking your IP address with the IP its server provides.

Without a VPN, many would have fallen victim to prying eyes and hackers on the internet. Because of an urgent need for online protection, a lot more people have found it necessary to buy a VPN service for their online protection.

This has led to a rise in VPN service providers. Worth noting is that this VPN services offer you several VPN products that are both free and paid. Best VPN products come at a cost as we shall find out later.

Free VPNs




Most VPNs come at a fee. Any VPN developer will tell you running a VPN service is never the cheapest of choices. To successfully run a VPN service, you need money for data lines and servers. Alternatively, you could pay for a cloud vendor that caters for bits both transmitted and stored.

With all the VPN expenses at hand, picture a free VPN. How does it get to pay for all the expenses it incurs if it claims to offer you a free service?

I know, if you are a free VPN user, you're now feeling concerned and assembling your arsenal to hit back. Of course, one of the reasons you have in mind is that free VPN services make money through Ads. Not letting this go down easily, you will also say they could do a lead in with the aim of upgrading sales.
Unfortunately for you, you are oblivious to the fact a free VPN could be a disguised racket of terrorists. A gang of terrorists could simply use a free VPN to steal your data and use it for unscrupulous purposes.
Here are reasons you want to consider before jumping into the next free VPN.

Many free VPNs have no regulations




It's interesting to note that even in countries where ISPs regulations are tight, ISPs almost always sell the data of their clientele albeit transparently.

VPNs on the contrary lack these set of regulations. With most of them operating offshore, they are highly unregulated. This means they could betray the trust of their clients by misusing their data.
You also want to avoid free VPNs from countries that have their security systems in the balance such as China and Russia. Such VPNs could be monitoring your data and use your logs against your account.

Slow internet speed due to prioritization of advert traffic




One way free VPNs make money is by generating revenue through adverts. As is the norm, many websites use adverts for revenue generation.
However, most VPNs use third-party advertisers that are unique to sessions of your proxy server. VPNs are looking for clicks on their Ads; what this means is that their network traffic will be given the first priority compared to your traffic.

Ultimately, this results into online pages loading slower than expected.

IP address exposure




VPNs keep you anonymous from the public web through private browsing. VPNs encrypt your data before taking it through a tunnel that is also encrypted.

Your data reaches the website you are trying to access as encrypted information. This makes your IP address untraceable.

Free VPNs do not guarantee an efficient tunnelling protocol. Its tunnel is more likely to have leaks which could expose your IP address and data. Once your data is exposed, it could fall into the hands of hackers who could use it for malicious purposes.

This is not to rule out that paid VPNs may not suffer from leaks. It's just that traffic leaks are much pronounced in a free VPN than a paid VPN. 

Your Computer's IP address could be used as a network endpoint.


Some VPN clients have fallen victim to VPN apps that took advantage of their IP addresses. Users could find their connections had been converted into end-points meaning their network experience turned out to be poor.

One typical example of this scenario was the use of the Hola VPN. After it was developed, it quickly gained tract as one of the most popular VPNs. Users had the privilege of bypassing geo-blocked websites to gain access to favorite online streaming services not streaming in their countries.

After attracting tens of thousands of users; the Hola VPN became embroiled in a scandal that so it lose its credibility among its users. It became apparent that it could use your connection to make better the network's bandwidth while creating a portal for other users.

If your connection is used to create end-points, that means that your IP address remains on server logs. If someone used these logs for an illegal activity and left through your exit node, you are rendered an accomplice for the illegal activity.

Though the Hola VPN is an isolated case, many free VPNs put you at risk of such unexpected events.

Final thoughts - Is Free VPN worth?


Before you choose to sign up for a free VPN, you want to consider the dangers and risks of using one. Free VPNs come with myriad security risks that you would want to avoid by not using a VPN at all. If you must use a VPN, use a paid VPN for your online safety and privacy.


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